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The Lifelong Effects of Childhood Obesity

By Carol Hamilton

Parents want the best for their children; they want them to be good in school, athletic, artistic, and socially accepted. That desire for a child’s perfection impacts how parents perceive their child’s weight. In a recent study parents were asked if they considered their 2-5 year old children, to be overweight, underweight, or just about right. The results showed 94.5% of parents with overweight children inappropriately perceived their child as just right. Likewise, 78.4% of obese children were perceived as “just right” by their parents (Duncan, et al. 2015). Without accurate parental recognition and lifestyle changes, childhood obesity can adversely affect an individual for the remainder of their life.

Some of the most prominent health issues adults face, heart disease, cancer, stroke, and Type 2 diabetes can be linked back to childhood obesity (Brody 2016). These adverse effects can show up prior to children even reaching adulthood including high blood pressure, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes. In a study conducted in Singapore, individuals who were obese as children are more likely to struggle with low self-esteem, confidence, and depression even more so than adults with onset obesity (Brody 2016). Children who are obese are also at higher risk of struggling with asthma, and excess musculoskeletal stress resulting in knee and hip pain, and difficulty walking.  Unhealthy dietary and lifestyle habits formed in childhood are often carried through adulthood (Kodama 2008).

The good news is we have the ability to correct childhood obesity through dietary education and lifestyle changes. At Doctor for Life, our staff recognizes the importance of preventative healthcare practices. Whether you, your child, or your whole family want to embrace a healthy weight lifestyle, we can help. Doctor for Life has a full team dedicated to creating a doctor-guided, patient-centered program individualized to your needs. We address all aspects related to living a healthy lifestyle including nutrition, exercise, behavior, and pharmacotherapy. One of the best gifts you can give your children is a healthy lifestyle and Doctor for Life can help you do that.

Works Cited

Brody, Jane E. “The Urgency in Fighting Childhood Obesity.” The New York Times, 2016.

Duncan, Dustin T, Andrew R Hansen, Wang Wei, Fei Yan, and Jian Zhang. “Change in Misperception of Child’s Body Weight among Parents of American Preschool Children.” Childhood Obesity, 2015.

Kodama, Hiroko. “Dietary Habits that Protect Children from Lifestye-Related Diseases: from the perspective of dietary education.” Journal of the Japan Medical Association , 2008.

 

Carol HamiltonThe Lifelong Effects of Childhood Obesity
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First Week

Like many people, I took advantage of a lot of opportunities to indulge over the holidays. Nearly every event was centered around food. The wine, beer and cocktails runneth over. My rambunctious brother was visiting and stayed at our house for a week. So yeah.

I think we all “give ourselves a break” during the holidays. Normal lives may be filled with order, boundaries, regime. Especially if your routine changes, like you are off work for a week, you are kind of vacationing from reality. You feel entitled to freedom, freedom from standard “proper” actions and freedom from guilt in your own mind. Like I said, I did it. Celebratorily. Gladly.

For the first week in January though, I came up with some “get back on track” rules for myself. (I know this could sound silly to some, but creating these rules on a weekly or monthly basis have been truly crucial to my personal health and fitness, the key to goal-setting.)

The rules for January 1-7 were simple:

  • No candy
  • No soda
  • No fried foods
  • No alcohol

One could certainly set stricter rules, and in the past I have. But in this case, I only wanted a solid week off from the top four offenders in my diet. These were the specific foods and drinks I noted I was consuming too much of in weeks prior. I had to cleanse!

Tuesday, January 2, I came home from work after a hazardous day. Here was my thought process…

  • Gosh, today was tough, and I’m exhausted.
  • I wish I could treat myself, to feel better, as consolation.
  • I really want two mini Milky Way bars that I got in my stocking.
  • I had a good day by the rules, did not have soda, fried food or alcohol.
  • Maybe that’s what I should do instead – just allow myself one thing from the No list each day.
  • Cool! I will have the candies.
  • Chomp. Chomp.

A minute later, I felt terrible. I had just set these rules for my First Week, and I broke one immediately. I thought, what the heck is wrong with me? I realized I wanted to write a blog post about this experience right then. I wanted to document my own journey and failure. If this happens to a health and fitness expert, then it most definitely happens to those unpracticed and unaware. My problem was talking myself into that candy. I rationalized why I could have it, why I deserved it. This thinking was not in line with my goal. The person who lost here was me.

This is what my clients go through every day when trying to be active and eat healthy. They set goals. They make themselves promises. They welch on the deal. Because behavior change is not instant. It takes having “I want the candy” moments followed by “I ate the candy,” “I know eating the candy does not get me to my goal,” and I resolve to not do that next time” moments.

We are all learning more, all the time. The better we recognize and analyze our behavior, the more likely we will change it and make positive, healthy lifestyle decisions.

Fitness Director,
Aarika Johnson

 

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Resolve To Succeed

It’s that time again. We can’t believe it’s December. Christmas is almost here. We recap our year, taking stock of the best times and worst times. We evaluate, how did 2017 go? We think about a new year and a new beginning. It means something to us, somehow.

Self-improvement is a shared hobby. It is estimated that greater than 40% of Americans make New Year’s Resolutions. But only about 8% achieve them.

People have good intentions. The problem lies in goal-setting. Say the first thought is “I want to lose weight.” A person may decide on a goal of losing 30 pounds.

“Losing 30 pounds” is an Outcome Goal. It’s what you accomplish after a series of steps. You have to work to get there. Instead, a person should focus on Behavior Goals – what, when and how you are going to do something in order to lose that 30 pounds.

I found a Forbes article that breaks down how to be successful with New Year’s Resolutions nicely, that is worth re-reading every year. Borrowing the sections…

Keep It Simple

We tend to set a huge goal or create a long list for ourselves. We are daunted from the start, which can lead to failing to launch at all or getting overwhelmed early. Instead, set small, attainable goals… “I am going to walk in my neighborhood.”

Make It Tangible

The more vague your resolution, the more vague your results. We have to be specific with our goals, and we have to measure the method. “I am going to walk in my neighborhood every Sunday for 30 minutes.”

Make It Obvious

Track, track, track! The pure idea that you have to document what you do (and don’t do) will affect your choices. It becomes real then. You have to admit it. Another great tactic is sharing your goals with other people – family, friends, social media. You are then accountable to more than just yourself.

Keep Believing You Can Do It

Simply setting a goal increases your chances of actually achieving something by 10 times (according to Statistic Brain). Yet average people get discouraged easily after a couple weeks or months. They feel defeated and at fault. Yet confidence is key. You have as much willpower as you think you have. So boost that willpower supply with some self-love and positive influences.

We’re just here to help. For impactful, longterm lifestyle changes in 2018, think about a Doctor for Life Healthy Weight Lifestyle Program.

 

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CDC: Forty percent of cancers linked to overweight or obesity

A recent article by Internal Medicine News covered an October report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention citing that “being overweight or obese significantly increased the risk of developing at least 13 types of cancer.”

The study compared statistics between 2005 and 2014, showing that obesity-related cancers* increased by 7%. They found that 40% of nearly 1.6 million of all cancer diagnoses were people with overweight- or obesity-related cancers. The rates were more pronounced in older people (50-74 years of age) and women (possibly because of female-specific cancers). Although, during that same time period, incidences of cancers unrelated to body weight decreased by 13%.

CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, MD…

A majority of American adults weigh more than recommended – and being overweight or obese puts people at higher risk for a number of cancers – so these findings are a cause for concern. By getting to and keeping a healthy weight, we all can play a role in cancer prevention.

Doctor for Life bridges the gap to fight overweight and obesity and chronic disease. Our Healthy Weight Lifestyle approach helps mitigate these negative statistics with screening and prevention. Our lead physician is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Obesity Medicine.

Dr. Cheryl…

Even though the effects of unhealthy weight on diabetes, cardiovascular disease, mortality and other health outcomes are widely known, there is less awareness that unhealthy weight gain is associated with increased risk of certain cancers. There are opportunities for Clinical Intervention, and at DFL, we have all the available tools with services and programs to fight these dreadful diseases.

*Excluding colorectal cancer


READ >>
http://www.mdedge.com/internalmedicinenews/article/149108/obesity/cdc-forty-percent-cancers-linked-overweight-or-obesity

 

 

Aarika JohnsonCDC: Forty percent of cancers linked to overweight or obesity
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Low-Fat Foods Are Making You Fatter

What? Fat is not the Devil? Sugar is the leading cause of weight gain? Check out this video our Dietitian found (from the host of TruTV’s Adam Ruins Everything, as posted by CollegeHumor). Very insightful and entertaining presentation about a huge myth – that eating fat makes you fat. Instead, hear how bad science and the sugar industry worked together to dupe Americans, or at least not tell the whole story for many decades.

Daniel, RDN, says…

The sweet truth finally comes out – fat isn’t making you fat. Why does it take forever for the REAL truth to surface? Food without fat… Is like LIFE without love! Take a look.

 

 

 

Aarika JohnsonLow-Fat Foods Are Making You Fatter
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Thanksgiving Tips

Soon we’ll gather for Thanksgiving to celebrate good times, great food and fellowship with friends and families. We’ll get out the “good china” and produce grand tablescaps to impress our guests. Some of us take great pride in our culinary skills, believing we have what it takes to be “Top Chef.” We’ll take command of the kitchen to produce the lion’s share of extraordinary dishes that will be served throughout the day.

All of us at the Doctor for Life wish you a happy, healthy Thanksgiving Day! You probably won’t eat Doctor for Life-perfect, and that’s okay. Don’t worry about it! Enjoy the day. How you eat on Thanksgiving Day does not determine your health; how you eat the other 364 days of the year does. Here are 9 tips for making this special day healthier, plus 3 post-binge tips (in case you need them).

Pre Thanksgiving Tips:

Eat Breakfast.
Start a healthy Thanksgiving with a big bountiful breakfast like hot whole-grain cereal and an egg-white omelet brimming with veggies. That’s because saving up calories for the big meal rarely works. You end up “spending” a lot more by overindulging on belly busters like a full ladle of gravy (about 800 calories!) instead of a tablespoon-size taste (70 calories).

Pitch In.
Call your host and say, “I’d love to bring something. What are you planning on serving?” If you discover that one of the dishes is particularly unhealthy, offer to bring your own version. Sweet potatoes, for example, can be real killers – full of butter, syrup, and marshmallows. But when prepared within Doctor for Life guidelines, they’re perfectly healthy – and absolutely delicious. Just bake the yams in foil at 400 degrees F until their syrupy juice starts to seep out, usually about one hour. Then, peel and layer them with pineapple slices and a little cinnamon.

Know Yourself.
For most of us, there’s a certain part of the meal that gives us the most trouble. For some, it’s alcohol. For others, it may be dessert. Devise a strategy. For alcohol, tell yourself, “I’ll enjoy a half glass of wine with appetizers, and a half glass with dinner,” or decide to stick with mineral water at first, saving your alcohol for the main meal. Or, if you have a tough time putting on the brakes once you get started, don’t start. Steer clear of the bar – and relish everything else the day has to offer – good conversation, good food, and good memories.

If you have a sweet tooth, plan for it. If a taste of chocolate satisfies you, take it. Enjoy it. But if one taste sends you lusting for a lot more, offer to bring your own healthy dessert, such as fresh raspberries and sorbet. Or have dessert waiting for you when you return home. A nice reward for a job well done! Put the mindful eating skills you learned at Doctor for Life into practice. Eat slowly. Savor every bite.

Position Yourself Well.
Don’t put yourself right in front of the candy dish. Who needs the agony? Plant yourself elsewhere, facing other pleasures – a nice fire, warm smiles, good tunes and a dance floor. You’ll have a much better time, and you’ll like yourself a lot more come morning.

Divide Your Plate Well.
As you learned at the Doctor for Life, fill your plate half with vegetables, one quarter with white turkey meat, and the rest with a healthy starch, like corn on the cob, a baked potato, or sweet potatoes Doctor for Life-style.

Savor Every Bite.
Eat slowly, putting your fork down between bites, and really savor each mouthful. It’s one of the easiest ways to enjoy your holiday meal without going overboard on calories.

Do What You Want; No One’s Watching.
People often think that if they say “no” to certain dishes, everyone notices, or the host is insulted, when in fact there’s a very good chance no one notices. Just play it down. Simply say, “No thanks, I’m full,” or “Try me later.” Then, sit back and enjoy the rest of your healthy Thanksgiving Day.

Start Thanksgiving With Physical Activity – And Stay Active.
Take the focus away from binging this Thanksgiving. Go outside and enjoy the crisp autumn air. Take a walk early in the day. And after dinner, suggest everyone go out (if the weather permits) for a neighborhood stroll. What a wonderful way for families to enjoy the holiday together. Another tip: Plan some outdoor fun before dinner, like a game of soccer or volleyball with the kids. (It’s a great strategy for keeping the appetizer buffet at bay, too.)

Keep Your Goals Firmly In Mind.
Before leaving for the party, steal away for a little quiet time to focus on you, only you. Take a few deep breaths, and remind yourself of your ultimate vision – a leaner you, a healthier you, a happier you. Then, tell yourself, “It’s going to be a great evening with family and friends!” Julia Child (of all people) said it best: “Life is the proper binge.”

Post Thanksgiving Tips:

Get Right Back On Track.
Don’t let a Turkey Day binge turn into an “I blew it” binge that lasts till January 1st. Toward that effort, make sure that you’re returning to a home well stocked with healthy foods for the day after Thanksgiving. A big bowl of fresh fruit on the kitchen table. Fresh salad fixings in the fridge for lunch. Nonfat yogurt and other healthy snack foods. Make healthy use of leftovers. Top your salad, for example, with strips of roasted, skinless turkey breast. And certainly, keep moving. Get back to your regular Doctor for Life exercise routine, or if guests are in town, plan something active for all of you for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. A hike in the woods. A game of softball. Cruising the shopping mall. In other words, do your best to stay off the couch.

Stick To Your Normal Doctor For Life Routine.
Don’t, for example, overcompensate for your Thanksgiving binge over the next several days with a ton of hard-core exercise. Just stick to your regular fitness schedule. Trying to cram in extra workouts at the gym could leave you feeling stressed out. What’s worse, they may lead to an injury, benching you for the next several weeks. That’s the last thing your health and weight-loss goals need. Don’t let one day of overeating turn you into a butterball. Pick yourself up and get back on track.

In the days after Thanksgiving, don’t starve yourself either. Sure, it seems like a good idea; you want to eat less to make up for the Turkey Day binge. But as you learned in your health coaching and nutrition sessions at the Doctor for Life, restricting your food intake will only make you hungry. And when your stomach growls for too long, you know what happens. Any leftovers sitting in the fridge, especially the fatty, sugary ones, end up in huge platefuls in front of you.

Instead, start your day with a nice big bowl of hot, whole grain cereal topped with fruit, and if you’d like, an egg-white omelet full of stir-fried veggies. Round out the rest of the day with plenty more super-healthy Doctor for Life-style foods, like:

  • Fresh fruit
  • Fresh veggie snacks with hummus
  • Green salads
  • Cooked whole grains like whole wheat pasta, brown rice, barley, and quinoa
  • Corn tortillas with lettuce, onions, salsa, and pinto beans
  • Hearty, bean-rich soups
  • Fish
  • Nonfat Greek yogurt
  • No-sugar-added applesauce


Stop With The Guilt.

No good comes from beating yourself up. In the coming weeks (when the four main food groups for many people are cookies, candy, fudge, and booze), do your best not to descend into a “binge-guilt-binge-guilt-oh-what-the-hell” cycle. Focus instead on the present, and praise yourself for laying the groundwork with a post-Thanksgiving Doctor for Life plan. Be proud that you’re conscious of your eating and exercise behaviors, and your efforts to improve them.

Even better, lay the groundwork for a healthier life in 2018 and beyond. Consider booking a culinary class or health coaching session at Doctor for Life in January. That way, even if you slip up over the holidays, you’ll have peace of mind knowing that you’ve already made the commitment to “get clean” in 2018.

Here’s another plus about booking a Doctor for Life session in the New Year. Slated for roll-out in January 2018 is a new specialty program that will give you highly personalized support all year long. Keep on the lookout for details coming soon or give us a call.

With sessions at Doctor for Life, plus on-going support, you’ll really have something to celebrate in 2018!

Executive Chef,
Rodney

 

 

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Behavior Change Revolution

I was listening to a podcast from Freakonomics Radio entitled “How to Launch a Behavior-Change Revolution.” It relates entirely to my everyday struggle as a health and fitness professional, and covers an underlying issue for client success in Healthy Weight Lifestyle Programs at Doctor for Life.

Behavior change is a big ask. Experts understanding thinking and decision-making is tough. The average person understanding his or her own influences and patterns is tougher. And that person actively choosing to change and diligently fulfilling that path is the toughest of all. I say to clients all the time, “Knowing what to do and actually doing it are two different things.”

The podcast representatives state that human nature is to “repeatedly make decisions that undermine their own wellbeing” and that “people rarely behave as rationally as economic models predict.” They believe that studying and trying to implement behavior change is the most worthwhile pursuit for any scientist, that it is wise to help people make better decisions for themselves and for society. I agree.

With the staggering and growing statistics in obesity and chronic disease, particularly a lifestyle-related disease like Type II Diabetes, I do not doubt that the general public is ignorant to the fact that all these per-day and per-meal unhealthy decisions add up. Of course, it is much more convenient to eat a fast food cheeseburger today than to worry about how that affects many tomorrows and premature death.

This podcast focuses on a group of researchers, a dream team, coming together to work on the Behavior Change for Good Initiative. Their mission is to determine best practices in three realms – number one being Health (smoking cessation, healthy eating, increasing exercise, reducing alcohol consumption). They are partnering with large organizations for participation and funding of real-world experiments, helping scientists discover insights that could address the pressing social problem of self-destructive humans and establish long-lasting behavior change.

The Behavior Change Revolution has been happening for decades – in academia for a while, and creeping into government policy shops and commercial firms more recently. But it is hardly mainstream yet. Institutional and societal change, when it happens at all, usually happens slowly and with a lot of pushback. So this team’s ambition is quite lofty (and time-consuming, and expensive).

Will it take a nudge? Will it take expanding or shrinking choice sets? Will it take redesigning how incentives in given situations are set up, via smart algorithms or old-fashioned human touch? The ultimate goal is to help people get satisfaction they’ll need in the short-term and outcomes they’ll want in the long-term.

LISTEN >> https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wnyc/freakonomics-radio/e/51990740

Fitness Director,
Aarika Johnson

 

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Let’s Play the See-Saw Game

Full-fat On One Side, Low-fat On the Other Side

For the last several decades (beginning post-WWII, following Dwight D. Eisenhower suffering heart problems, Ancel Keys’ crusading for the avoidance of fat and cholesterol, etc.), the American population has been told, advised, warned, etc., that FAT is a dangerous enemy (at one point, it is said that Americans feared fat more than they feared communism); that Americans (and the entire world should follow our example, because we couldn’t be wrong on any account), should reduce, eliminate, and avoid EVERY opportunity where fat reared its ugly head. LOW-FAT became the new dogma, it was quickly embraced (even after some faulty and ill-planned research studies and agencies did not provide concrete evidence showing fat to be dangerous) by the general medical community and tortuously forced upon the lay people.

I am a huge proponent of critical thinking… and like to stir the critical thinking pot in other people as well. An important question that must be asked: what occurred post-WWII in terms of food, diet, fat, etc.? Without having to dig too deep, one would realize that the consumption of butter decreased, while the consumption of margarine and vegetable-based cooking oils increased. This is in large part due to Ancel Keys’ work, in which he strove to convince people to switch from (natural) fats like butter, egg yolks, milk, cheese, meat, steaks, etc., and use highly-processed vegetable oils instead. Keep in mind that the food pyramid was soon to come on the horizon, too, and its foundation was built upon carbs, carbs, and more carbs. Cardiovascular disease rates started climbing higher and higher each year, and currently, it is ranked the top killer in the United States. Obesity and diabetes has also been on the rise as well. Is it any wonder that the top causes of mortality in the US are closely linked with nutrition? The single most dangerous weapons of mass destruction, at least here in America, are our eating utensils (spoon, fork, and knife). A diet that has largely consisted of carbohydrates (processed and refined, mind you), and void of critical fats, does not seem like it has worked in our favor. Fortunately for protein, it has been sitting somewhat quietly on the sidelines, letting carbohydrates and fats go at each other’s throat.

There have been some wobbling in nutrition recommendations in the recent years. A heated debate on whether fats, saturated fats, butter, coconut oils, etc., have been our foes, or friends, continues picking up momentum. As always, on the nutritional field, there are constantly two sides to the same story. Which side is correct? The side that has more monetary / financial backing? The side that has more scientists, medical doctors, nutritionists, etc.? Keep in mind, the popularity is not always right. In many cases, it isn’t.

To truly understand whether fat is going to put a person 6 feet under at an earlier age, or whether it can extend the human life and confer excellent health benefits, one must look back in history to monumental work conducted by a gentleman named Dr. Weston A. Price. Dr. Weston A. Price (1870-1948), was a Cleveland dentist, who gained the title: “Isaac Newton of Nutrition.” In his search for the causes of dental decay and physical degeneration that he observed in his dental practice among the children that were frequenting his office, he shifted from test tubes and microscopes, to unstudied evidence among human beings. Dr. Price sought the factors responsible for fine teeth among the people who had them- the isolated “primitives.” (At this point, you’re probably thinking, “What does fat have to do with teeth?” You’ll find out in just a few lines). The world became his laboratory. As he traveled, his findings led him to the belief that dental caries and deformed dental arches resulting in crowded, crooked teeth, and unattractive appearance, were merely a sign of physical degeneration, resulting from what he had suspected: nutritional deficiencies.

Price traveled all around the globe in order to study isolated human groups, including sequestered villages in Switzerland, Gaelic communities in the Outer Hebrides, Eskimos and Indians of North America, Melanesian and Polynesian South Sea Islanders, African tribes, Australian Aborigines, New Zealand Maori and the Indians of South America. Wherever he went, Dr. Price found that beautiful straight teeth, freedom from decay, stalwart bodies, and resistance to disease and fine characters, were typical of primitives on their traditional diets, rich in essential food factors. When Dr. Price analyzed the foods consumed and prepared by isolated primitive peoples, he found that they provided at least four times the calcium and other minerals. BUT, MOST IMPORTANTLY, he found TEN times the amount of fat-soluble vitamins from animal foods such as butter, fish eggs, shellfish, and organ meats (Oh, you mean, fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, affect health, as well as bones, and teeth? Yup!) in their diets.

The importance of good nutrition for mothers during pregnancy has long been recognized, but Dr. Price’s investigation showed that primitives understood and practiced pre-conception nutritional programs for BOTH parents. Many tribes required a period of pre-marital nutrition, and children were spaced to permit the mother to maintain her full health and strength, thus assuring subsequent offspring of physical excellence. Special foods were often given to pregnant and lactating women, as well as to the maturing boys and girls in preparation for future parenthood. Dr. Price found these foods to be very rich in fat-soluble vitamins A and D nutrients found only in animal fats (Wait, you mean, fat is important for health, and pregnancies, and children, and growing healthy bodies? Yup!). Keep in mind, FAT-SOLUBLE vitamins are ONLY found in FAT-CONTAINING sources. Does watermelon have any fat in it? Have you ever heard anyone say that watermelon is a good source of Vitamin A? Think again.

These primitives with their fine bodies, homogeneous reproduction, emotional stability and freedom from degenerative ills stand forth in sharp contrast to those subsisting on the impoverished foods of civilization-sugar: white flour, pasteurized milk, and convenience foods filled with extenders and additives (among a host of other unhealthy and/or untested compounds). This circles back to the depiction of the Food Pyramid that was based on an overload of carbohydrates making up one’s meal. Bread, brown rice, white rice, pasta, cereals, etc., do NOT provide adequate / natural sources of Vitamins A, D, E, and K. Not for this topic, but some carbohydrates ARE quite healthy.

So, to briefly highlight some recent nutritional news, a study was released in which it was discovered that low-fat diets are linked to a higher likelihood of death at an earlier age by almost 25%. The study appears to have studied ~135,000 individuals who had reduced their consumption of fats, when compared to those people who were consuming greater amounts of butter, cheese, and meats. Those who had a lesser consumption of fat were consuming more bread, pasta, rice…but unfortunately missing out on the essential vitamins. The article can be found at the link below:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/29/low-fat-diet-linked-higher-death-rates-major-lancet-study-finds/

Not enough convincing information? There’s plenty more which shows some benefit to including more full-fat products in one’s diet. How about yogurt, for reducing the risk of diabetes?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/07/full-fat-milk-may-drastically-reduce-risk-of-diabetes—study/

Not enough convincing information? How about the possibility that a low-fat diet may increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease? Keep in mind (pun intended) that fat is critical for cells, and cholesterol is a HUGE component of the neuronal “wiring”, i.e., electrical circuits and connections. So if a human being has been on a low-fat, cholesterol-free diet for a large part of their life, they may not have adequate “supplies” for sharp, quick nervous system / brain / spinal cord connections and function.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607223327.htm

On the see-saw, the full fat wins (think about it; full-fat equals MORE fat, heavier…while low-fat contains less, is lighter, it will be up in the air). Always remember, “Food without fat is like life without love.”

 

The Fat Dietitian,

Daniel Andras, M.S., R.D., L.D.

 

 

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Atlanta MANIA

MANIA is an annual fitness convention offered in multiple states by SCW Fitness Education, where professionals go to earn credits, get certifications, network with peers, learn new material and be utterly inspired. This year’s Atlanta conference was held July 28-30, and our Fitness department was in attendance.

One Doctor for Life priority is enlisting the most qualified employees. We take pride in investing in staff, providing Certified Personal Trainers and others with continuing education opportunities. The goal was to have trainers and group exercise instructors return from this conference enthusiastic, knowledgeable and better able to serve clients.

Here’s what the team had to say…

“What a fantastic experience to reinvigorate the spirit! I loved going with colleagues because we got to know one another better, shared a lot of laughs and commiserated over being exhausted after multiple hours of exercise. I felt lucky to have picked such a thought-provoking two-day lineup. My favorite session was Barre Trilogy with Leslee Bender. She was charismatic and wise. The class was part lecture and part activity. We covered warm-ups and cool-downs with myofascial release. I was fascinated by the impact these can have on performance and recovery.”   — Aarika

“MANIA was an overall awesome opportunity. It was a great chance to catch up on what is going on in the fitness industry, what the latest trends are and the current research and application. My favorite class was definitely a tie between Stress and Chronic Disease by Kimberly Garcia and Everything Resistance Training by Dr. Len Kravitz. Both of these lectures were super informative, […] explaining the physiology behind everything we discussed. Dr. Kravitz challenged you to […] take a more scientific approach to training clients. Kimberly Garcia encouraged us to look outside the box at how different factors are stressing the body, and how these stressors may be affecting our clients’ overall health and well-being.”   — Chris

“This past weekend in Atlanta for the SCW Fitness Conference was a wonderful experience, and I certainly think my time was well spent in the classes. Some of the sessions incorporated lectures to refresh already acquired knowledge, and then brought attention to additional information that can be used to further health and fitness for clients and myself. My favorite class was a very challenging workout with SGT Ken, which was as physically taxing as it was mentally exhausting. SGT Ken’s class sparked some ideas of how to workout more efficiently, so that each exercise session presents the rewarding feeling that only comes from the combination of motivation and hard work.”   — Anna

 

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