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Artificial Sweeteners – We Once Thought Were “Okay” But Recent Research Points in the Direction That They Are Not “Okay”

Research that has recently surfaced in 2017 is adding to the “arsenal” of nutritional information that Artificial Sweeteners (AS’s) may not be all that great for the human body, regardless of the fact that they may have zero calories. Among many other negative side effects, this recent research is showing that these AS’s may increase a person’s risk of STROKE and DEMENTIA (damage to the brain due to interrupted blood supply, and decreased mental capacity, such as memory loss, personality changes, impaired reasoning, respectively).

It seems that the scientific study did not show as strong of a risk when people consumed regular sugar or sugar-sweetened beverages…however, this is NOT to say that one can/should consume the same amount of sugar and expect great health! Sugar still provides a LOT of unnecessary calories that can be transformed into triglycerides (TG’s) and lead to weight gain. What the research article seems to be saying is that the risks are not the same between SUGAR and ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS… AS’s appear to be way more damaging and risky!

Artificial sweeteners include: saccharin, acesulfame, aspartame, neotame, sucralose, and many more.

Artificial sweeteners have also been shown to cause glucose intolerance in mice by altering gut microbiota, and are associated with dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in humans. In other words, glucose intolerance is a pre-diabetic state of HYPERglycemia which is associated with insulin resistance and may increase risk of becoming fully diabetic; altered gut microbiota / dysbiosis simply means there is an imbalance in the healthy bacteria that live inside the digestive tract, which are super important for the health of the body!

Take-away? Eliminate artificial sweeteners as much as possible from your diet, in the form of Splenda, diet soft drinks, pancake syrup, etc., and opt for natural sweeteners, in very small amounts, such as honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar, or spices like cinnamon.

If you wish to read the scientific paper for yourself, it can be found at: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/04/20/STROKEAHA.116.016027

For Your Health,

Daniel Andras, M.S., R.D., L.D.

Daniel AndrasArtificial Sweeteners – We Once Thought Were “Okay” But Recent Research Points in the Direction That They Are Not “Okay”
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Revisiting the “Low Sodium Will Prevent High Blood Pressure” Conventional Wisdom

Hello Folks,

Not giving the green light on excessive salt to flavor your food just yet, but once again, more evidence that lower-sodium diets *may not be effective* in reducing blood pressure. Was involved in a huge journal club project on this topic exactly three years ago during a dietetic internship which, then, supported the now-more recent findings… as we continue to shed light on the intricate workings of sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, etc.

Some important pieces of information from the article:

“A new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn’t associated with lower blood pressure.”

“We saw no evidence that a diet lower in sodium had any long-term beneficial effects on blood pressure. Our findings add to growing evidence that current recommendations for sodium intake may be misguided.” – Lynn L. Moore, DSc, associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine

“Over the next 16 years, the researchers found that the study participants who consumed less than 2,500 milligrams of sodium a day had higher blood pressure than participants who consumed higher amounts of sodium.”

What’s important to note is that there needs to be a balance of adequate levels of the other electrolytes present, especially POTASSIUM – “The researchers also found that people in the study who had higher intakes of potassium, calcium, and magnesium exhibited lower blood pressure over the long term.” POTASSIUM is a nutrient that a lot of people may be deficient in. Some good sources of potassium include coconut water, avocado, acorn squash, spinach, sweet potato, bananas, etc.

For Your Health,

Daniel Andras, M.S., R.D., L.D.

 

You can follow the link here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170425124909.htm

 

Daniel AndrasRevisiting the “Low Sodium Will Prevent High Blood Pressure” Conventional Wisdom
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Savor Your Food: 5 Tips To Slow Down While Eating

Eat slowly, eat less. You’ve probably heard it before, but most people still eat too fast. Did you know that it takes about 20 minutes for your body to signal that it’s full. So when you eat too quickly, you end up eating more. A recent study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found eating slowly led to lower hunger ratings in both normal weight and overweight people. So if you have some weight to lose and feel you may be racing through your food, there is a way for you to train yourself to slow it down.

knife and fork with clock plate

Eat regularly. When you’re starving, your eyes become bigger than your stomach, and you want to scarf down whatever food is placed in front of you, regardless of its flavor. Avoid this situation by scheduling meals within four hours of each other. This way, you won’t be ravenous when you sit down to eat and are more likely to focus on your food and savor the flavors.

Sit down. Eating on the go, standing at the counter, or on your couch is a surefire way to eat too quickly. Sitting down at the table allows you to focus on the meal in front of you and keep track of how much you have eaten. It’s harder to keep track of how much you have eating when you’re getting up constantly to go to the fridge or grazing all day.

Turn off the tube. The television is a distraction. One study found viewers ate almost double when watching an action flick than those watching a talk show. Why? The action flick was more distracting. Get rid of this distraction completely by turning off the TV while you eat. You will survive 30 minutes without background noise and feel better about your weight loss progress.

Put your utensil down between each bite. If you’re having trouble slowing down, one technique that may help is putting your utensil down between each bite. This allows you to focus on the flavor while chewing your food before taking another bite, giving your brain more time to signal that your body is full.

Eat on a smaller plate. We’ve all been raised to “clean our plates.” So it should come as no surprise that we tend to finish all food in front us, regardless of how big that plate is. Try this: next time you sit down for a meal, serve yourself on a smaller plate. You’ll get that same satisfaction of finishing your food, but in reality you’ll be eating less than you usually do.

rfosterSavor Your Food: 5 Tips To Slow Down While Eating
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4 Tips For Dining Out While Losing Weight

Who would ever think that going to a restaurant could be a stressful event? But for millions of people trying to lose weight, it’s a reality. Between the tantalizing dish options and social fear of being labeled “the dull one” by friends, it takes a lot of willpower to stay on track. Or does it? There are actually a few tricks you can rely on to ensure that you don’t stray from your plan and still have a good time. 

1. Start By Getting Full.

While your dinner companions dive into the bread sticks that usually come before your meal, you can feel satisfaction in having knowledge they don’t. If you start by eating foods with a lot of fiber, like a salad or veggie appetizer, you will wind up eating less overall. Studies have shown eating a low-calorie first course enhances the feeling of fullness and lowers the total number of calories eaten during the meal. Be aware of how much dressing is used on your salad or appetizer. The recommended amount is no more than two tablespoons. To make things easy ask for the dressing in a cup on the side.

2. Stay Away From Sugary Drinks

Try to avoid beverages that contain large amounts of sugar (yes, this means you margaritas). Drinks that are high in sugar are also high in calories, and research from Harvard University found that people who drink sugary beverages do not feel as full as if they had eaten the same calories from solid food. Drink water or unsweetened tea and to avoid the excessive calorie consumption in drinks. If cocktails must be a part of the experience, look for a less sugary option, like wine or beer. And of course always use common sense when consuming alcohol!

3. Contol Your Pasta Portion

Eating at an Italian restaurant? If you decide to go with a pasta dish, be very aware of the portion distortion that often happens at a restaurant. The normal serving size of a cup of pasta is only 220 calories. According to research from New York University, a typical dinner portion of pasta at a restaurant can be 480 percent larger than a cup. That’s over 1,000 calories! Try sharing a plate of pasta or eating half and taking the rest home in a doggy bag. This will help you avoid eating too many calories at once and save money on the bill!

4. Make Healthy Swaps

The side dishes that come with your main course can be switched for healthier alternatives that pack a high nutritional punch without taking away from the overall meal experience. For instance, if your dish comes with white bread or rice, ask the waiter for brown rice or whole-grain bread. Swap out French fries for steamed vegetables. Just like your starter salad or vegetable appetizer, these friendly swaps will make you feel fuller faster due to their high fiber content. So don’t be afraid to ask the server questions about the options available to substitute into your meal.

The last important thing to remember about eating out is this: if you feel like you succumbed to temptation and “slipped up,” don’t beat yourself up. You have the confidence and information to know how to correct your course if you veer off path. It happens to the best of us every now and then. That’s life, so embrace every second of it!

rfoster4 Tips For Dining Out While Losing Weight
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