Behavior Change

The Lifelong Effects of Childhood Obesity

By Carol Hamilton

Parents want the best for their children; they want them to be good in school, athletic, artistic, and socially accepted. That desire for a child’s perfection impacts how parents perceive their child’s weight. In a recent study parents were asked if they considered their 2-5 year old children, to be overweight, underweight, or just about right. The results showed 94.5% of parents with overweight children inappropriately perceived their child as just right. Likewise, 78.4% of obese children were perceived as “just right” by their parents (Duncan, et al. 2015). Without accurate parental recognition and lifestyle changes, childhood obesity can adversely affect an individual for the remainder of their life.

Some of the most prominent health issues adults face, heart disease, cancer, stroke, and Type 2 diabetes can be linked back to childhood obesity (Brody 2016). These adverse effects can show up prior to children even reaching adulthood including high blood pressure, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes. In a study conducted in Singapore, individuals who were obese as children are more likely to struggle with low self-esteem, confidence, and depression even more so than adults with onset obesity (Brody 2016). Children who are obese are also at higher risk of struggling with asthma, and excess musculoskeletal stress resulting in knee and hip pain, and difficulty walking.  Unhealthy dietary and lifestyle habits formed in childhood are often carried through adulthood (Kodama 2008).

The good news is we have the ability to correct childhood obesity through dietary education and lifestyle changes. At Doctor for Life, our staff recognizes the importance of preventative healthcare practices. Whether you, your child, or your whole family want to embrace a healthy weight lifestyle, we can help. Doctor for Life has a full team dedicated to creating a doctor-guided, patient-centered program individualized to your needs. We address all aspects related to living a healthy lifestyle including nutrition, exercise, behavior, and pharmacotherapy. One of the best gifts you can give your children is a healthy lifestyle and Doctor for Life can help you do that.

Works Cited

Brody, Jane E. “The Urgency in Fighting Childhood Obesity.” The New York Times, 2016.

Duncan, Dustin T, Andrew R Hansen, Wang Wei, Fei Yan, and Jian Zhang. “Change in Misperception of Child’s Body Weight among Parents of American Preschool Children.” Childhood Obesity, 2015.

Kodama, Hiroko. “Dietary Habits that Protect Children from Lifestye-Related Diseases: from the perspective of dietary education.” Journal of the Japan Medical Association , 2008.

 

Carol HamiltonThe Lifelong Effects of Childhood Obesity
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First Week

Like many people, I took advantage of a lot of opportunities to indulge over the holidays. Nearly every event was centered around food. The wine, beer and cocktails runneth over. My rambunctious brother was visiting and stayed at our house for a week. So yeah.

I think we all “give ourselves a break” during the holidays. Normal lives may be filled with order, boundaries, regime. Especially if your routine changes, like you are off work for a week, you are kind of vacationing from reality. You feel entitled to freedom, freedom from standard “proper” actions and freedom from guilt in your own mind. Like I said, I did it. Celebratorily. Gladly.

For the first week in January though, I came up with some “get back on track” rules for myself. (I know this could sound silly to some, but creating these rules on a weekly or monthly basis have been truly crucial to my personal health and fitness, the key to goal-setting.)

The rules for January 1-7 were simple:

  • No candy
  • No soda
  • No fried foods
  • No alcohol

One could certainly set stricter rules, and in the past I have. But in this case, I only wanted a solid week off from the top four offenders in my diet. These were the specific foods and drinks I noted I was consuming too much of in weeks prior. I had to cleanse!

Tuesday, January 2, I came home from work after a hazardous day. Here was my thought process…

  • Gosh, today was tough, and I’m exhausted.
  • I wish I could treat myself, to feel better, as consolation.
  • I really want two mini Milky Way bars that I got in my stocking.
  • I had a good day by the rules, did not have soda, fried food or alcohol.
  • Maybe that’s what I should do instead – just allow myself one thing from the No list each day.
  • Cool! I will have the candies.
  • Chomp. Chomp.

A minute later, I felt terrible. I had just set these rules for my First Week, and I broke one immediately. I thought, what the heck is wrong with me? I realized I wanted to write a blog post about this experience right then. I wanted to document my own journey and failure. If this happens to a health and fitness expert, then it most definitely happens to those unpracticed and unaware. My problem was talking myself into that candy. I rationalized why I could have it, why I deserved it. This thinking was not in line with my goal. The person who lost here was me.

This is what my clients go through every day when trying to be active and eat healthy. They set goals. They make themselves promises. They welch on the deal. Because behavior change is not instant. It takes having “I want the candy” moments followed by “I ate the candy,” “I know eating the candy does not get me to my goal,” and I resolve to not do that next time” moments.

We are all learning more, all the time. The better we recognize and analyze our behavior, the more likely we will change it and make positive, healthy lifestyle decisions.

Fitness Director,
Aarika Johnson

 

Aarika JohnsonFirst Week
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