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Welcome Aarika

Welcome the newest member of our team – Fitness Director and Development Lead Aarika Johnson!

Doctor for Life is a medical practice specializing in Healthy Weight Lifestyle. With a unique and complex operation, combining Clinical, Nutrition and Fitness services to change lives, the right talent can be hard to find.

Aarika comes to us with diverse experience in communications and health and fitness. She is a Certified Personal Trainer and Nutrition Counselor, formerly the Wellness Director at the YMCA of Greater Spartanburg, and formerly owning her own marketing and advertising agency Brandfarmers. This blending of industries is an excellent fit for the future vision at Doctor for Life, where our main objective for the coming years is to raise awareness about who we are and how we approach holistic patient care.

From Aarika…

 

I’ve always wanted to help people. I used to say as a child I’d like to be a doctor or a nurse. But school and career took me down a different path in communications. My love for talking and writing was certainly utilized and honed. After many years though, I knew I was not fulfilled. I soul-searched and realized that I wanted to follow my passion for health and fitness, doing something that really matters to me, and to others. I mean, one has to work. Why not let that be work with such purpose? I suppose you could say I quick-started my “second career.” I believe I was so highly motivated and, thankfully, blessed with skills, that I just pushed forward to learn as much as possible, meet countless inspiring professionals and embed myself in a new field. Now, I can say with certainty, I have chosen to be here. Get ready Doctor for Life clients!

 

Aarika JohnsonWelcome Aarika
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Summer’s Here, Sun’s Out, But What About Sunscreen?

You’ve heard this before a countless number of times: “Be sure to lather on the sunscreen when you go outside in the sun!” in order to prevent the risk of skin cancer. But is that really true? Do you need to PAINT your skin white with sunscreen in order to avoid the sun’s warm rays which are the #1 source for triggering the activation of Vitamin D in your body? Over the last few decades that we’ve been sternly warned that everyone should wear gobs of sunscreen on their skin when going in the sun, there has also been a MASSIVE decline in the populations’ internal Vitamin D stores. Not a good thing.

A new study from the Journal of American Osteopathic Association estimates that it is very possible that close to 1 BILLION people worldwide may fall into a “deficient” or “insufficient” Vitamin D category. Skin color does affect the amount of Vitamin D the human body will produce, but there are other factors that can severely decrease this critical nutrient. More and more people are unfortunately spending time indoors, at their workplace, in offices, at home, etc.  And on top of that, when people DO spend time outdoors, a certain percentage may be lathered with sunscreen, for fear of contracting skin cancer. Other factors that influence Vitamin D activation include diabetes (the kidneys are critical to the final step in activating the nutrient, so if they are damaged, Vitamin D stores will, also), gastrointestinal issues, Vitamin D-poor diets, etc.

One doesn’t need to spend hours on end in the blistering sun. That isn’t very wise. Obtaining at least 20-30 minutes of exposure to as much body surface area as possible (your arms and legs should do fine), several times a week should do the trick. After that, you have several options: put on a long sleeve shirt, a hat, or other protective clothing; find some shade; if you REALLY feel the need for some sunscreen, do a little research and find healthier alternatives to what is commonly sold in the market stores, as these often contain a lot of potentially very harmful and toxic ingredients which could also lead to skin cancer. Believe it or not, the skin is able to absorb a lot of things!

Bottom line, you want to protect your skin at the same time that you need your skin to be exposed to UV-B rays in order to produce Vitamin D (which is important in bone health, immune function; healthy, normal cell reproduction, warding off depression, etc.)…BUT! Always relying on sunscreen to protect you from the risk of skin cancer can be detrimental because a) it will block your skin’s ability to produce this fat-soluble vitamin, and b) sunscreen lotions may contain ingredients which can wreak havoc on the health of your skin and do exactly what it is intended to prevent, as well as mess with body’s hormones! More to come on better alternatives to sunscreens.

For Your Health,

Daniel Andras

Daniel AndrasSummer’s Here, Sun’s Out, But What About Sunscreen?
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Artificial Sweeteners – We Once Thought Were “Okay” But Recent Research Points in the Direction That They Are Not “Okay”

Research that has recently surfaced in 2017 is adding to the “arsenal” of nutritional information that Artificial Sweeteners (AS’s) may not be all that great for the human body, regardless of the fact that they may have zero calories. Among many other negative side effects, this recent research is showing that these AS’s may increase a person’s risk of STROKE and DEMENTIA (damage to the brain due to interrupted blood supply, and decreased mental capacity, such as memory loss, personality changes, impaired reasoning, respectively).

It seems that the scientific study did not show as strong of a risk when people consumed regular sugar or sugar-sweetened beverages…however, this is NOT to say that one can/should consume the same amount of sugar and expect great health! Sugar still provides a LOT of unnecessary calories that can be transformed into triglycerides (TG’s) and lead to weight gain. What the research article seems to be saying is that the risks are not the same between SUGAR and ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS… AS’s appear to be way more damaging and risky!

Artificial sweeteners include: saccharin, acesulfame, aspartame, neotame, sucralose, and many more.

Artificial sweeteners have also been shown to cause glucose intolerance in mice by altering gut microbiota, and are associated with dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in humans. In other words, glucose intolerance is a pre-diabetic state of HYPERglycemia which is associated with insulin resistance and may increase risk of becoming fully diabetic; altered gut microbiota / dysbiosis simply means there is an imbalance in the healthy bacteria that live inside the digestive tract, which are super important for the health of the body!

Take-away? Eliminate artificial sweeteners as much as possible from your diet, in the form of Splenda, diet soft drinks, pancake syrup, etc., and opt for natural sweeteners, in very small amounts, such as honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar, or spices like cinnamon.

If you wish to read the scientific paper for yourself, it can be found at: http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/04/20/STROKEAHA.116.016027

For Your Health,

Daniel Andras, M.S., R.D., L.D.

Daniel AndrasArtificial Sweeteners – We Once Thought Were “Okay” But Recent Research Points in the Direction That They Are Not “Okay”
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Revisiting the “Low Sodium Will Prevent High Blood Pressure” Conventional Wisdom

Hello Folks,

Not giving the green light on excessive salt to flavor your food just yet, but once again, more evidence that lower-sodium diets *may not be effective* in reducing blood pressure. Was involved in a huge journal club project on this topic exactly three years ago during a dietetic internship which, then, supported the now-more recent findings… as we continue to shed light on the intricate workings of sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, etc.

Some important pieces of information from the article:

“A new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn’t associated with lower blood pressure.”

“We saw no evidence that a diet lower in sodium had any long-term beneficial effects on blood pressure. Our findings add to growing evidence that current recommendations for sodium intake may be misguided.” – Lynn L. Moore, DSc, associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine

“Over the next 16 years, the researchers found that the study participants who consumed less than 2,500 milligrams of sodium a day had higher blood pressure than participants who consumed higher amounts of sodium.”

What’s important to note is that there needs to be a balance of adequate levels of the other electrolytes present, especially POTASSIUM – “The researchers also found that people in the study who had higher intakes of potassium, calcium, and magnesium exhibited lower blood pressure over the long term.” POTASSIUM is a nutrient that a lot of people may be deficient in. Some good sources of potassium include coconut water, avocado, acorn squash, spinach, sweet potato, bananas, etc.

For Your Health,

Daniel Andras, M.S., R.D., L.D.

 

You can follow the link here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170425124909.htm

 

Daniel AndrasRevisiting the “Low Sodium Will Prevent High Blood Pressure” Conventional Wisdom
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Why Being a Foodie Requires more than Loving Food

There are over 56 million pictures and stories on Instagram that have foodie as a hashtag. In a way, that’s 56 million meals, where people declared their love for food. However, we have to arbitrarily take a step back and think: is loving food really just about finding out what’s currently the trend, or trying to create one?

I myself like eating the best food out there, and buying from farmers’ markets, eating at up-and-coming restaurants as well as trying the supposed “best” of something are practices that I’ve dabbled in from time to time. It’s a great way to find new flavors, eating out with friends is a great social experience, and it is pleasurable to eat something that may not be found anywhere else. Being a foodie I believe is innate in all of us, however, I believe that the practice of being a foodie may be taken too out of context.

Not saying that eating is bad, since finding what satisfies us best is naturally what we’re designed for in the first place.  We are built to sustain our existence, and eating is a process that has evolved from a survival instinct to an experience. We have become civilized enough to know that eating is not only required for our daily sustenance, but it’s become part of our culture, and having meals served with the proper preparation and ambience will allow us to gain pleasure from our culinary experiences.

The world of social media has only heightened this evolution, as eating very special meals that are not of the fast-food variety has become trendy and hip: you gain more social credibility when you discover the new best pizza on the scene, the latest restaurant that features organic, home-made tacos, or that hidden gem of a bar that serves the most innovative cocktails. These social activities have their place, but I propose to take a step back, and examine what being a true foodie should be.

In my line of work, emotional eating is a serious dilemma. Although these often occur at times of stress, emotional eating can be prevalent in normal circumstances. Indeed, social media can become a stressor itself, as it tends to lead to people-pleasing, and when we try to please others, we actually tend to eat more.

When people live to eat rather than eat to live, their poor eating habits create an unhealthy lifestyle that isn’t easily curbed by medicine or tr­eatment. Most attribute eating as a passion, and call themselves foodies that like to try food for the sake of adventure and knowledge. They disregard the possibility that although they use this to connect socially through their escapades, it also leads to weight gain and obesity that cannot fully be recoverable from if their lifestyle choices are mainly to showcase their love of eating. Again, eating out and sharing your discoveries is fine, however, there are other ways to be a foodie that doesn’t risk your well-being.

I believe that to be a true foodie, you must love food second, and love your health first. Instead of looking for the trendiest meal now, or the most in-demand ingredient to add to your meal, may I suggest looking for the healthiest option that packs its own good flavor? There are a number of vegetables, fruits, types of meat and spices that will not only satisfy your taste buds, but also give the necessary nutrients to stay healthy and invigorate your need to be fit. There are superfoods that act as catalysts for your body to take a step towards health, and they can either be created in your own kitchen, or to practice being a real foodie, are available in shops and restaurants with enough research. Being healthy and fit is actually considered as a trend, so why not take advantage of restaurants that offer healthier alternatives?

I believe the best version of a foodie is someone who looks for the best meals and ingredients that would complement healthy living. Truthfully, to put this into action may be difficult, but one aspect of being a foodie knows what the best out there is. Perhaps with the proper knowledge and motivation, foodies will look for what’s best for their health.

– Dr. Cheryl Sarmiento

Cheryl SarmientoWhy Being a Foodie Requires more than Loving Food
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Healthy Meals To Go

Doctor For Life provides HEALTHY MEALS TO GO, packed meals that are nutritious and appetizing. These meals are designed by Dr. Cheryl and Registered clinical dietitian Daniel Andras and cooked to perfection at our Culinary lab by our head executive chef, Rodney Foster.

These meals run from $5-$12, affordable and readily available for any time of the day, whether you’re in need of breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

To ensure that you’re on top of your diet, Doctor For Life allows you to choose how much calories you want to partake. This ensures that you can still enjoy of your favorite Sloppy Joes for lunch at 400, 500, or 600 calories per meal.

Chef Rodney also offers Lunch and Learn on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 12:00 to 12:45. He demonstrates how the healthy savory meals are prepared and cooked. Lunch will be served from the freshly created food for just $10!

rfosterHealthy Meals To Go
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A Look at Body Composition Analysis

bcascale

Over the years, two key indicators have measured a person’s health risk due to weight: pounds (or kilograms) and body mass index (BMI). While that still holds true today, research has determined that these factors alone do not tell the whole story. In order to accurately assess your true health risk, you need to know your body’s composition. That is, a reading of fat, muscle and water percentage will give you critical information for creating an effective strategy for safe, long-lasting weight loss.

The ultimate goal in losing weight is to know that the right type of weight is coming off, which means reducing fat and increasing or maintaining muscle mass.

So what is used to measure a body’s composition? Up until the 1990’s, the closest we could get to determine body fat percentage was through the use of calipers. Calipers work by pinching a fold of skin on various parts of the body. They may be effective in reading the fat percentage of specific body sections, but they do not provide the most accurate total body fat percentage.

Then through medical technological advancements, the DEXA scan was introduced, which is known as the gold standard of body composition measurement. The DEXA machine works by having a patient lie down motionless on a table while the scanner moves over each part of the body. After five to ten minutes, results are generated showing the detailed percentages of fat, muscle and water in the entire body as well as compartments of the body (e.g., left arm, right arm, torso). The procedure is a breakthrough in body composition analysis (BCA), but it remains generally inaccessible due to its high costs, ranging from $100 to $300 per session.

Luckily today, there is a much lower cost analysis option with measurement capabilities that are close to those of the DEXA. It comes in the form of a scale that is just like the one you see in our office, but with features that make the critical difference in measuring your health risk profile.

The BCA scale utilizes bioelectrical impedance to determine a person’s water weight, fat mass, and predicted muscle mass for the body and each major body component This non-invasive method sends a low-level electric current through the body,. Body composition is calculated from the resistance to the flow of the electrical current. Don’t let this scare you! It’s safe and you don’t feel a thing.

Body composition analysis is fast and simple. The BCA scale reads results within seconds. Regular BCA scale readings make it easy for medical providers to fine-tune your weight loss program based on how you are progressing. For instance, if you’re exercising and the traditional scale shows that you’ve gained pounds, you may feel discouraged. However, the BCA scale may show that you’ve lost body fat, an indicator that the added weight may be muscle produced from your fitness activities. This is exactly the direction you want to go! Higher muscle percentage beats higher fat percentage any day of the week.

If you haven’t measured your body composition and feel that your weight may be the source of your health issues, go ahead and make an appointment with our office. The earlier you know your body’s breakdown, the sooner you can take steps to improve your health and well-being.

rfosterA Look at Body Composition Analysis
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Why Losing Weight Gets Harder as You Age (And What You Can Do About It)

older-adult-fitnessThe saying “youth is wasted on the young” might just hold the most meaning when talking about weight loss. In our early years, we rarely give a second thought to the consequences of splurging on late night milkshake and fries. It may create temporary uncomfortable feelings, but we can bounce back the next day with fairly little effort. And then we do it again and again, because our young, energy-efficient bodies give us the runway to do so. How wonderful, right?!

But then life plays a cruel joke on us as we creep up in age. At first the changes are subtle. Recovery time from splurges lengthens and we notice that it’s not as easy as it used to be to shed unwanted pounds. Then before we know it, we feel stuck in a place we really don’t want to be. The weight either won’t come off (or stay off) and the cycle of discouragement sets in. Should we just surrender to the ravages of time and suffer the consequences of the natural aging process?

No! And we’ll tell you why and how.

In order to beat Father Time at his aging game, we need to take a look at the main culprits that make it harder to lose weight as we move on in years.

Muscle Loss – You may not realize it, but your body begins to lose muscle mass after the age of 30. Muscle is the body’s best calorie burner, and the more muscle your body has, the higher your metabolism will be. Losing muscle tissue lowers your metabolism, so even though you may be eating the same amount as when you were younger, you will begin to store excess calories in the form of body fat.

Calorie Needs – As you age and naturally lose muscle mass, your body requires fewer calories in order to maintain your current weight. If your calorie intake stays the same as your metabolic rate slows, and you don’t increase your physical activity, weight gain becomes unavoidable.

Stress– As we age, we often take on new life responsibilities, such as building a career, raising a family, and keeping up with mortgage payments. All of these responsibilities can create high levels of stress, which has a very real impact on health and well-being. What you may not know is that the stress you’re dealing with may be a contributor to overeating and weight gain. Cortisol, also known as the stress hormone, is associated with fat accumulation along the midsection of the body. The more cortisol produced, the more stubborn belly fat to battle. Even more discouraging, higher cortisol levels also result in increased calorie consumption. In a British study, researchers found that people with high cortisol levels were more likely to snack in order to cope with the daily hassles in their lives than low-cortisol producers.

Now, let’s talk about how we can turn back the hands of time, at least physically:

Build Lean Muscle Mass – A proven way to build and maintain lean muscle mass is to eat greater amounts of protein-rich foods such as lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, and seeds. Protein provides the building blocks for healthy muscle and generally increases satiety levels, which results in less hunger and therefore less calorie consumption. If you don’t consume the excess calories, they have no chance for your body to store them as fat.  But remember, don’t overdo it on the protein. Too much protein can backfire on you in the form of unwanted stress on your organs’ ability to successfully metabolize it. Balance it with foods with high fiber and healthy fats.

Exercise is another important tool in fighting muscle loss that comes with age. According to a study published in The American Journal of Medicine, after an average of 18 to 20 weeks of progressive resistance training, adults can gain over two pounds of lean muscle mass, and increase their overall strength by over 25 percent. To ensure safety and success, speak with your medical provider before starting any exercise program.

Reduce Calorie Consumption– This always sounds like a major downer, but many people confuse cutting back on calories with having to eat less. The best thing to do is choose foods that have high nutrient density. This means you can eat more, but without all the extra calories your body doesn’t need. Next time you’re at the market, choose high-fiber foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. And don’t forget to drink plenty of water to help you feel full.

Reduce Stress– The path to stress reduction might not be as clear as that for building muscle mass or cutting back on calories, but it is critical to reduce stress if you are trying to lose weight. There are actually many different proven ways to do this. One popular way is through increasing activity levels.. A simple 20-minute workout can reduce stress, clear your mind, and burn extra calories. Many people today are also enjoying the stress-busting effects of meditation. There are several different forms of meditation, so explore them to see which might suit your preferences and lifestyle. And if you are unsure about which action to take to reduce stress, at a minimum, just talk to someone. Let them know about your pressures and desire to more effectively manage them. The process of revealing your thoughts to an empathetic supporter provides stress relief on its own.!

If you can identify the specific weight loss challenges in your life, you can take the necessary actions to achieve healthy weight loss, which has the high probability of reviving some of that same energy you felt when you were younger. The end result of effective weight loss could mean that we can live with the wisdom and grace that only age can give us, but in a younger-feeling, healthier body. Now that sounds pretty wonderful to us.

rfosterWhy Losing Weight Gets Harder as You Age (And What You Can Do About It)
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Does Your Weight Increase Your Risk of Injury?

knee_painObesity can hurt us, and not just with greater risks of serious health conditions like diabetes, heart disease, and hypertension. It affects our bones, joints, ligaments and tendons, which we need for optimal mobility in our busy daily lives. When our skeletal and muscular systems are compromised, physical injuries are more likely to occur.

About one in five people suffer an injury that requires medical attention, and research shows a link between obesity and higher injury risks in adults.. According to a study published in the American Journal of Health Promotion, the odds of sustaining an injury are 48 percent greater for those who are living with obesity. Obesity may limit what a person can do physically (like climbing up a flight of stairs), making it easier to get hurt.

Let’s examine areas of the body that are more prone to injury due to increased pressure on them by excess weight.

Knee joints. Obesity can increase wear-and tear on knee joints and cause osteoarthritis (OA). When you walk across a flat surface, the force exerted on your knees is about one-and-a-half times your body weight. That means a 200-pound person puts 300 pounds worth of pressure on their knees with every step. Obese men and women are five times more likely to suffer from OA. OA can lead to torn ligaments and other serious knee injuries that may require surgery.

Back. Disc degeneration occurs naturally as you age, but excess weight may speed up the process and lead to injury. A study published in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism found that men and women suffering from disc degeneration had significantly higher body mass indexes (BMI). In some cases, pain from disc degeneration can lead to disability from work. Excess weight, particularly in the abdomen, can shift your center of gravity, putting more stress on your back muscles.

Where are you most likely to injure yourself? According to the Center for Disease Control, the leading cause for injury is falls in or around the home. This is likely from a lack of peripheral sensation, general physical weakness, and instability while walking or standing. According to a study from Ohio State University, individuals living with obesity were twice as likely to suffer an at home injury compared to those at healthy weights.

Obesity also presents dangers at work. An eight-year study published in PLOS ONE found that obesity increased the risk of work-related injury by 20 percent. The list of occupational injuries is staggering- broken bones, dislocations, sprains, strains, concussions, internal injuries, slips, trips, stumbles, falls.

Workplace injuries can also become a financial nightmare for people suffering from obesity. A study by Duke University found that medical costs for morbidly obese employees were seven times higher than for employees with recommended weights.

So what can you do to lower your risk of injury?

You guessed it- weight loss! A study published by the Journal American Medical Association found that obese men and women who participated in a diet and exercise program were able to lose 10 percent of their body weight were able to improve mobility, knee function, and quality of life. We know it’s easier said than done, but the effort will be well worth it in the long run.

There are times when injuries are out of our control. But managing weight is one thing we can do to lower our risk of injury and improve our overall health. Talk to your medical provider about your weight loss options.

rfosterDoes Your Weight Increase Your Risk of Injury?
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Exercise or Diet: Which is More Important For Weight Loss?

diet-and-exerciseIf you are exercising regularly, but don’t see the numbers going down on the scale, you might be misguided about the best way to lose weight. Many people fall into the trap that exercise alone will make the pounds come off. The training montages in action movies, extreme weight loss programs on TV, and fitness success stories can motivate us, but they paint an unrealistic picture about the role of exercise in losing weight. How has this idea gained so much credit?

The human body contains fat mass and lean mass, which includes muscle. It’s scientifically proven that muscle is the body’s best fat burner, and that having more muscle will lead to weight loss. And how do you get more muscle? Because it is most associated with muscle development, the most popular answer is through exercise. This probably explains why it is widely accepted as a primary weight loss solution.

The truth is, it is extremely difficult to lose weight from exercise alone. A pound of fat is 3500 calories. In order to burn off that pound, you would need to bike ride for about seven hours. But wait, we haven’t even counted the calories you’re consuming from food. If you are consuming 2000 calories a day, you would we need to work out for four hours a day just to maintain the same weight. You would end up working out over 40 hours a week to lose weight, and that’s if everything is perfect.

It is much easier to cut calories out of your diet than burn them through exercise. Let’s go back to the example of the pound of fat. If you regularly eat two small bags of potato chips a day, you’re consuming about 500 calories from these snacks. If you cut this treat out for one week, the calories you save will add up to a pound of fat.

Increasing physical activity has many health benefits, but the part it plays in weight loss isn’t as large as the public may think. Let’s take a look at the role of exercise in the different stages of weight loss:

Weight Loss Beginner

You are now on the road to weight loss, and like any journey, you must choose a path. The key to losing weight is consuming fewer calories than you burn, and developing healthy eating habits is your ticket to long-term success. First you need to know how many calories you’re eating. This sounds easy enough, but more often than not we eat a lot more than we think. A study by Cornell University found that overweight people tend to underestimate the calories they are consuming by 40 percent. The best way to count calories is to record your meals in a food journal.

As a weight loss beginner, you will need to increase your knowledge of your calorie sources- proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and sugars. Each of these sources can have vastly different effects on hunger, metabolism, and regions of the brain that control food intake. Protein-rich foods will boost your metabolism and curb your appetite while sugary foods may reduce your brain’s ability to release signals of fullness, causing you to eat more. As you increase your nutrition knowledge, you will find foods that both facilitate weight loss and you enjoy eating.

Now that you’re eating healthier, you will begin to notice the number on the scale going down. Weight loss will bring about changes to your body mass composition. As you shed pounds, your ratio of lean mass to fat mass will improve. This means you will start having more muscle tissue than fat from dieting alone. And as we all know, muscle is our body’s best calorie burner!

Continuing to Lose Weight

You have lost weight and noticed differences in how you look and feel.  But after your initial weight loss, you may struggle to lose more weight and hit a plateau. As you weigh less, your body will require fewer calories or more physical activity to sustain your lower body weight. This is a time when you can start to consider exercise as part of your weight loss program. The added exercise will help build muscle and burn more calories to help break the plateau. Hitting a plateau should also encourage you to reexamine your eating habits. You may be have grown comfortable with your food plan and begun overestimating your portion sizes.

Maintaining Your Weight Loss Success

Now that you’ve reached your weight loss goal, this isn’t a time to revert to old unhealthy habits. Managing weight is a lifelong process. Exercise is a marker for long-term weight loss. In a study published in the journal Obesity, more than half of all participants that were successful at losing weight were able to keep it off through diet and exercise alone after 8 years. Find an exercise program that works for you, and keep that weight off!

Bottom line: What you consume is most important for achieving weight loss. Exercise has many health benefits but shouldn’t be viewed as a be-all end-all weight loss solution. However, as you develop your nutritional knowledge and healthy eating habits, exercise plays an important component in long term weight maintenance.

rfosterExercise or Diet: Which is More Important For Weight Loss?
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